Martin Luther King, Jr. Flags

January 12, 2012

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is Monday, January 16, 2012, and it’s not too late to order a beautiful Martin Luther King, Jr. Decorative Flag from the United States Flag Store. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Flag is available in two sizes, 28” x 40” (vertical orientation) or 3 ft x 5 ft (horizontal orientation). Both flags are made from high quality nylon, feature vibrant colors and a beautiful design, and are suitable for indoor or outdoor use.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. flags feature a beautiful portrait of Dr. King on the right side of the flag with an American flag waving in the background. The text “Martin Luther King, Jr.” appears in gold letters at the top of the flag, and the text, “Yesterday’s Dream, Tomorrow’s Reality,” appears in red letters at the bottom of the flag.

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the most influential figures in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Born on January 15, 1929, Dr. King grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. After becoming an ordained clergyman, completing graduate studies at Boston College, and serving as clergyman at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, Dr. King became active in the Civil Rights Movement. Using teaching from Christian tradition and the nonviolent protest philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi, Dr. King used the power of words, nonviolent protests, and grassroots organization to pave the way for equal rights in the United States.

Dr. King was an influential leader, along with Rosa Parks, in the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955. In 1957, he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization that proved essential to direction to the Civil Rights Movement. In 1963, Dr. King was one of the leaders behind the March on Washington, where he delivered his famous, “I Have a Dream speech.” Dr. King is among the youngest recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize, which he received in 1964. Dr. King was shot in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1964 while delivering a speech to improve wages and conditions for sanitation workers.