Canada’s 150th Birthday!🍁

June 30, 2017

Just before Independence Day in the United States, our neighbors in the North celebrate Canada Day on July 1. This holiday is celebrated much like the 4th of July here in the United States with barbecues, fireworks, and most importantly, patriotism.

Canada Day marks the anniversary of the day when Canada became its own nation from Great Britain through the Constitution Act of 1867. At the time, Canada was originally British territory, so once the Dominion Act was signed into effect, four provinces were created. These provinces were New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada, which was divided into two provinces that are known as Ontario and Quebec.

In the early years of Canada Day, the holiday was not celebrated as much. It wasn’t until recently that people began to celebrate the holiday more often and is taken more seriously. The people of Canada proudly display their red and white maple leaf as much as their southern neighbors bring out the stars and stripes. But did you know the Canadian flag was not always a maple leaf?

Canada’s flag originally had the Canadian Red Ensign on it. It was red with a Union Jack in the corner along with Canada’s Coat of Arms on the lower right. It was not until 1964 when then-Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson informed the House of Commons that the government had asked to adopt a new flag for the country. This flag was inaugurated in 1965 after submissions were made for the new design and the current maple leaf design was approved.

The red maple leaf of Canada is a symbol of patriotism and identity for Canadians. They wear it with pride every July 1 as well as year round. Pins are worn on lapels, maple leaves are painted on faces at sporting events, or flags are simply waved next to another’s in solidarity with their neighbors. If you have a family member or a neighbor who is from Canada, surprise them with one of our Canadian flags from our flag store!

Happy Canada Day!

 

-CD

 

 

http://www.rmwb.ca/living/Events-and-Festivals/Canada-Day.htm

 

 


State Post – Illinois

September 29, 2015

Illinois became the 21st US state on December 3rd, 1818. Illinois was founded by two French explorers, Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet in 1673. In 1679, French settlers arrived and established the first settlement of Cahokia. Great Britain later gained the area during the French and Indian Wars in 1763.

Illinois originally had a state flag in 1913 which chose Lucy Derwent’s submission of the Great Seal of the State of Illinois, which had been created in 1868, on a white background. The flag depicts a bald eagle, symbolizing the United States, perching itself on a rock while carrying a shield in its talons. The shield is of the original 13 stars and stripes. In its beak is also a red ribbon, reading State, Sovereignty, National, and Union. However, Sovereignty is upside down. The dates on the rock, 1818 and 1868 are the years Illinois became a state and when the current Great Seal was ptsil_-00_front_illinois-embroidered-patchpicked up. The flag was eventually redesigned in 1970 by a Mrs. Sanford Hutchinson. In the newer version, the name Illinois now reads underneath the eagle in blue. There is also ground around the rock the eagle sits on alongside a sea and a sun in the background. The ground by the rock represents the soil of Illinois.

Illinois is known as the Land of Lincoln, for Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States. Although Lincoln was born in Kentucky and spent his childhood in Indiana, he moved to Springfield, Illinois (which eventually became Illinois’ capital) in 1830 where he eventually became a lawyer. He gained fame during his campaign for Senator of Illinois thanks to his debates with his Democratic opponent Stephen A. Douglas. Although Lincoln lost the election, it helped pave the way for his presidential nomination just a few years later.

Lincoln, as President, helped abolish slavery during his term. He created the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 that freed the slaves within the Confederacy. He also delivered his most famous speech, the Gettysburg Address, that same year. He delivered it at the dedication of the National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in which he began with the famous, “Four score and seven years ago”.

Tragically, Lincoln was assassinated on April 14, 1865 at the Ford’s Theatre in Washington by John Wilkes Booth, who was an actor. He was there with his wife to see a play called “Our American Cousin”. Booth’s motive for the assassination was that he believed he was helping the South. Lincoln is interred just outside Springfield at the Lincoln Tomb State Historic Site.


New Year, New Flag

January 5, 2015

flag historicalNew Year, New Flag

It seems like January was a stellar (pun intended) month to join the Union, adding each State’s star to Old Glory. The constellation of the stars within the union, one for each State, is symbolic of our Federal Constitution, which holds each State to their individual sovereignty.

As these January-inducted States joined the Union, a Star was added. Here are the Seven:

Georgia January 2. 1787 The 17th Star

Connecticut January 9, 1788 The 18th Star

michigan-nylonMichigan January 26, 1837 The 26th Star

Kansas January 29, 1861 The 34th Star

Utah January 4, 1896 The 45th Star

New Mexico January 6, 1912 The 48th Star

Alaska January 3, 1959 The 49th Star

If you live in, are from, love one of these states, celebrate its induction this month. Fly Old Glory or order a State-specific Flag today. Start off the New Year flying your colors.

Happy New Year!

**Jacquie


Vote 2014

November 4, 2014

vote repWhen I was growing up we had Civics Class. Civics taught you what it meant to be American, in a country where you had the right and honor to be apart of the what is bigger than just you but the community in which you live. Civics: the study or science of the privileges and obligations of citizens. Webster Dictionary. Being a good citizen is voting.

vote demo 1The timeline of our country’s voting has not always been to encompass all. The beginning brought only white and landowners in 1790. In 1870, the 15 Amendment was passed to include former slaves and all men of any race. In 1920, suffrage movement guaranteed women the right to vote. In 1965, the Voting Rights Act was passed to protect the rights of minorities and eliminates any poll tax. Finally in 1970, the age requirement was lowered to 18 years old.

I have always felt it a privilege and an obligation to vote. I do so with pride and honor. I do not vote a straight ticket. I research each fellow citizen. I also read up on laws to be voted on and try to make an informed decision.

vote paceTomorrow, I go back to where I voted for the first time when I turned 18. I remember being so excited. My mom took me and as we stood in line, I was so new and naïve. Knowing that by voting, I will put my mark on history to bring about change.

GO VOTE!

**Jacquie


Checking it twice!

September 30, 2014

santaWe are getting ready for Christmas. Making lists for the little ones. Asking the older ones what they want. I have already created an event for a Cookie Exchange for early December. I invited 25 people for the exchange and I hope we get at least 20! I love the holidays! I think it is mostly the family getting together from just around the corner and many miles away. I also like the goodwill towards others; we tend to give to others more around the holidays. very sad but very true.

fishI was thinking of gifts for family and friends and trying to keep a budget – UGH. I have relatives and friends that have everything, they don’t need things. But everyone has a like, a hobby, a passion that is hidden if you look around. Mine is Santa Claus, I don’t like clutter, so I get to bring out my Santas at Christmas, display them and pack them until the next season.

While scrolling through United States Flag Store for a Santa themed Garden Flag. I thought what better way to stay in budget but to buy garden flags? For the holiday season there is Jesus, Santa, nature. There are snowmen and animals – so many different themes and motifs. They are just so many to choose from.

hummingbirdI thoumonogramght, What about the men in my life? There are all sports-themed (Pro and College), any branch of the military, golf, fishing, historical, nautical. I think I am on to a great idea! For the ladies in my life, hummingbirds, flowers, welcomes, and so many seasonal: spring, winter, fall, summer, Valentine’s day, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Easter, St Patrick’s Day. Ok, I do not have to list them all – you get the idea! The ideas are not exclusive to gender because I have some picked out that would look great at my uncle’s home and that one is a farm theme. Pricing ifor the ones on my list range from $9.00 to $18.00. With that in mind, I am thinking for a couple presents, I can combine a gift for the home with a monogram instead of some gift they will re-gift next year! Happy Shopping!

**Jacquie


National Airborne Day

August 15, 2014

 August 16, 1940 is the first established Army Parachute jump. In August of 2002, President George W. Bush put forth the proclamation for August 16th to honor the Airborne Forces, annually.

The idea of men jumping out of planes was not a new one, it was tossed just after World War I by General William (Billy) Mitchell. The General tested this out in San Antonio, Texas as a demonstration. Although the jump went well, the theory did not catch on here in America. During World War II, Germany started to use paratroopers in 1940 to quickly invade and surprise the enemy behind their own resistance. Triggered by the success Germany’s Fallschirmjäger , the US Military branches began a full-scale production to develop this type of warfare. In April of 1940, the War Department approved a test platoon of Airborne Infantrymilabr35p_-00_purple_illustration_airborne-flag-regular-3x5ft-polyester under the Army’s Infantry Board, this was set up at Fort Benning 29th Regiment.

In July of 1940, First Lieutenant William T. Ryder volunteered and was designated the Platoon Leader. Because of the rigid physical and health standards set, only 48 were elected out of 200 volunteers. Lieutenant Colonel William C. Lee, a staff officer for the Chief of Infantry, was intently interested in the test platoon. He recommended that the men be moved to the Safe Parachute Company at Hightstown, NJ for training on the parachute drop towers used during the New York World’s Fair. Eighteen days after organization, the platoon was moved to New Jersey and trained for one week on the 250-foot free towers.(http://freepages.military.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~douglas/Creeds_Histories/abnhistory.html)

Because the towers worked so well the Army purchased brought them to Fort Benning. In less than 45 days, on August 16, 1940, out of a Douglas B-18 over Lawson Field the first drop was held. Out of these 48 men, they held a lottery to see who would go after Lieutenant Ryder and Private William N. (Red) King. On August 29, 1940, the platoon made the first mass jump in the United States. Less than 45 days it took these dedicated men to be ready for their first jump. That is crazy-brave.

The traditional paratrooper cry “GERONIMO” was originated in the 501st by Private Aubrey Eberhart to prove to a friend that he had full control of his faculties when he jumped. That cry was adopted by the 501st and has been often used by paratroopers since then.

The First all black 555 Parachute Infantry Company is remembered as the Triple Nickel. Another landmark is in December 1973, when Privates Joyce Kutsch and Rita Johnson became the first women to graduate from the Basic Airborne Course.

**Jacquie


National Navajo Code Talkers Day

August 14, 2014

Navajo Code Talkers Day is celebrated on August 14, President Ronald Reagan declared in 1982 to officially honor the Code Talkers for their service to our country. During World War II the Allied Forces found it hard to stump the Japanese code breakers or cryptographers. Now a little history: the military was not the one to come up with idea it was civilian named Philip Johnston, he was a civil engineer in Los Angeles but had grown up on the Navajo Indian Reservation, his parents were Protestant missionaries. Johnston read an article about the military communications debilitating losses. Johnston went to Camp Elliott to meet with Lieutenant Colonel James E. Jones, Marines’ Signal Corps Communications Officer. Jones was not convinced that it would work but after Johnston explained the language, inflections and completely different meanings that one word may mean, they gave it a try. The initial run was a success so the Marines needed volunteers by mid-April of 1942, they traveled to the Navajo reservation to recruit personnel. Now these recruits had to be bilingual in both English and Navajo languages. The enlistees also had to be physically fit. After boot camp, the new Marines were to construct a new Military code. “The first part, a 26-letter phonetic alphabet, used Navajo names for 18 animals or birds, plus the words ice for I, nut for N, quiver for Q, Ute for U, victor for V, cross for X, yucca for Y, and zinc for Z. The second part consisted of a 211-word English vocabulary and the Navajo equivalents. This code, when compared with conventional Marine Corps codes, offered considerable savings in time, since the latter involved lengthy encoding and deciphering procedures by Signal Corps cryptographic personnel using sophisticated electronic equipment.” http://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii-navajo-code-talkers.htm

There were 29 original Code Talkers. This became the 382nd Platoon USMCnavajo. By August 1943 the number swelled to over 200. 421 Navajos had completed wartime training at Camp Pendleton’s code talker school, and most had been assigned to combat units overseas. Navajo code talkers served with all six Marine divisions in the Pacific and with Marine Raider and parachute units as well. Major Howard Conner, the Fifth Marine Division’s Signal Officer, said that ‘The entire operation was directed by Navajo code. . . . During the two days that fol lowed the initial landings I had six Navajo radio nets working around the clock. . . . They sent and received over 800 messages without an error. Were it not for the Navajo Code Talkers, the Marines never would have taken Iwo Jima.’

In December of 2000 the US Congress passed, and President Bill Clinton signed into law, which awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to the original twenty-nine World War II Navajo code talkers, and the Silver Medal to each person who qualified as a Navajo code talker (approximately 300). In July 2001, U.S. President George W. Bush personally presented the Medal to four surviving original code talkers (the fifth living original code talker was not able to make it) at a ceremony held in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C. Gold medals were presented to the families of the 24 original code talkers no longer living.

The last of the original 29 Navajo Code Talkers passed away this year, June 4, 2014. His name is Chester Nez. Mr. Nez has a memoir, its title is: Code Talker: The First and Only Memoir by One of the Original Navajo Code Talkers of WWII

Hollywood made an historical fictional movie about Navajo Code Talkers, Windtalkers, released in 2002.

~Jacquie