Patriot Day

In 2001, America was changed forever when four hijacked planes crashed into three separate areas, the Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The attacks shocked and horrified the nation. In the weeks and months after the tragic event, America united in solidarity to mourn for the victims. Reactions and messages of support came from around the world, with one thing in common: We are all Americans.

In the days after September 11th, the American flag became even more symbolic. One of the most significant photos after the attacks were of three firemen raising a flag at Ground Zero. You may recall seeing flags flying on not just houses, but on car windows or antennas, and people wearing flag pins on their lapels. Stores ran out of flags, with a demand for more. Flag makers had to work even longer and harder in order to keep up. Some people even wore the flag, emblazoned on their shirts or on hats.

While nearly 20 years have passed since the horrific events of that day with the Pentagon rebuilt along with a new World Trade Center tower, but the pain of the attacks are still felt deeply. Memorials where the attacks happened now stand, where one can come to pay their respects. The flags are still flying high, even though they are flown and displayed less often than they were in the days following the attack. Americans commemorated the fallen and showed strength during a tough time in the nation by displaying their flag, reminding everyone else that they would not be brought down.

We Will Never Forget.

 

-CD

Flag Holidays

Some of you have asked when we should be flying our flags this year. According to USFlag.org, the following are 2015’s flag holidays*:

New Year’s Day, January 1st

Inauguration Day, January 20th, every time a new President is elected

Martin Luther King’s Birthday

Lincoln’s Birthday

Washington’s Birthday

Easter Sunday

Patriots Day, April 19 (not to be confused with Patriot Day, which is September 11th, another day in which to proudly display the stars and stripes)

National Day of Prayer, the 1st Thursday of May

Mother’s Day

Armed Forces Day, Every third Saturday in May to celebrate and thank the US Military in all five branches, Army, Navy, Air Force, US Marine Corps, and the US Coast Guard.

Memorial Day (half-staff until noon)

Flag Day, June 14th

Independence Day, July 4th.

Labor Day, (First Monday of September)

Patriot Day, September 11th. This day is observed to honor the victims of the September 11, 2001 tragedy. You may see flags raised at half staff on this day.

Constitution Day, September 17th

Columbus Day, October 12th

Navy Day, October 27th

Veterans Day, November 11th (Easy for me to remember because my nephew was born on this day and my older brother himself is a veteran)

Thanksgiving Day (last Thursday of every November)

Christmas Day

Election Days

And of course, on your state birthday! Click here to find your state’s birthday. Usually the flag is to be risen at sunrise and taken down at sunset, on days when weather permits.

Note: In addition to all of this, the flag can also be flown as directed by the President of the United States.

*These dates are to the best of my knowledge.

~CD